News update!

As from 1st May 2020 we made the decision to retire from the GOsC, the regulatory body for osteopaths. This entirely voluntary decision was hastened by the unprecedented financial pressures precipitated by the coronavirus pandemic, and the ongoing difficulties caused by covid 19. The term osteopath is a protected title so this means that although we remain fully qualified as osteopaths we may no longer use the title ‘osteopath’. Instead we are calling ourselves Sutherland Craniosacral practitioners, and our practice name has become ‘Honiton Douglas-Mort Practice’. For several years we have been considering retiring as ‘osteopaths’ and renaming our practice to something that better represents the unique way that we work to help our patients. Our approach is founded on the many years of academic study and the 44 years each of clinical experience in practice that we have devoted to our work. As Sutherland Craniosacral practitioners we hope to

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Advice for people

Those doing outdoor jobs should remember to warm their muscles up gently before tackling heavy or awkward jobs. Cold muscles and stiff joints do not have the right level of circulation to do demanding or vigorous exercise and this predisposes to strain or more serious injury. The best way to warm up depends upon several factors related to the person themselves and the job they wish to do. Fit young to middle age people are usually suited to a few gentle stretches, jogging on the spot etc to loosen the joints warm up the muscles and get the circulation going. Older people, children, or those with health, cardiovascular or musculoskeletal problems should ask specific advice from their G.P. and their osteopath here at Honiton Osteopathic Centre for the best way for them to warm up. Once warm, wearing layers of clothing that you are able to shed and replace easily

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Travel and motoring advice

Summer is the time we all like to get away and is a peak time for travelling by all methods of transport. Everyone has their favourite way of eating up the miles! For those who have checked out our ‘Learn More’ pages, you may remember us mention the concept of ‘whole-body vibration’ where the body’s structure and circulatory system is affected detrimentally by the vibrations from the vehicles engine, the road or rail surface, or in a plane- the air turbulence. Long hours travelling tend to cause blood and lymph to pool in the lower part of our bodies causing stasis and congestion, at best this can make us tired and stiff as our physiology has been deprived of oxygen and stressed by the circulatory stasis. More seriously in people with already poor circulation, life-threatening thrombosis of the leg veins may occur. Additionally, we also suffer compressive effects to the

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Advice for gardeners

This is the time of year when we like to get stuck into gardening or outdoor jobs. For now, the weather has held us back from the garden chores, so for the moment we are less likely to strain ourselves there; however, once the rain does stop, it’s tempting to get out there and try to catch up with all the luxuriant grass and weed growth before it completely gets away from us. My advice is to take it easy and pace yourself to avoid injury. Do small amounts of each task taking regular breaks and varying jobs to minimise the risk of repetitive strains; remember its always easier to build up gradually giving your body time to acclimatise to the work, rather than overwhelming yourself by trying to finish the job in one go! If you do overstrain yourself, discontinue the work you have been doing immediately so as

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Hello and welcome to spring!

This is a time when we really feel the need to get to grips with the gardening and outside chores, but be careful to build up gently to the unaccustomed exertion to avoid injury, especially if you have been less active over the winter. Outdoor chores like digging and weeding, for example, place an uneven strain on your back and pelvic joints; try to limit the time spent to 15 to 20 min stretches, and alternate the activity so that you use both sides of your body. Grass cutting and strimming are awkward activities placing strain on your body as you brace yourself and stretch for the last blade, your structure is also submitted to considerable vibration from the machines and this can cause jarring of your body leading to RSI and disc strains. Try to pace yourself with these jobs and other DIY tasks, and mix and match tasks

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Spring/ summer 2009 in brief!

We have been doing lots of things recently. Exciting recent events have included teaching cranial osteopathy to post-graduate osteopaths at a basic and more advanced level with the Sutherland Cranial College; this will ensure a continuing supply of highly skilled cranial osteopaths for the future. [photos to follow] Axminster Animal Osteopaths has also run its first weekend course, Module 1 ‘Comparative Equine Psychology and Behaviour’  of the new Equine Cranial Osteopathy pathway that will train post-graduate already skilled cranial osteopaths how to treat equines using cranial osteopathy. This course was very well received and we hope to repeat the module in the autumn [photos and write up to follow]. Module 1 is open to registered practitioners [osteopaths, chiropractors, acupuncturists, physiotherapists, etc] for details please contact us. Meanwhile, the horse that we took in for treatment with stringhalt and general spinal problems is progressing very well, we are optimistic that she

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